May 10, 2007

New Case Studies Released

Five new case studies released including Amtrak, SITA CUSS, ISI Gaming, Army Internet Gaming, and Vanguard Car Rental check-in.

Case studies published by KIOSK in Colorado and links are here:



Posted by staff at 12:41 PM

January 05, 2007

Airport & Check-In Kiosks -- Intellicheck Announces Orders in PR

Intelli-Check announces new deployment of drivers license devices being used by Alamo and National in their self check-in kiosks for car rental kiosks. The order reflects another 200 kiosks being deployed to these particular customers.

Intelli-Check Announces Multiple Purchase Orders for Its ID-CHECK(R) Technology from KIOSK Information Systems, Inc.

January 04, 2007 09:00 AM Eastern Time
Intelli-Check Announces Multiple Purchase Orders for Its ID-CHECK® Technology from KIOSK Information Systems, Inc.

-Successful Airport Pilot Program for Leading Brands National Car Rental and Alamo Rent a Car Results in Planned Deployment of Self Service Check-In Kiosks in Many Airport Locations-

WOODBURY, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Intelli-Check, Inc. (AMEX: IDN) announced today that it has received its second order totaling over two hundred of its ID-CHECK systems from KIOSK Information Systems, Inc. to be integrated into National Car Rental and Alamo Rent A Car self service check-in kiosks at multiple airports. Vanguard Car Rental USA Inc. is the operator of the National and Alamo brands.

The orders were placed by KIOSK after National and Alamo completed an extensive pilot program at three airports proving the successful operational performance of Intelli-Check’s ID-CHECK technology. Based on the solid integration and outstanding field performance of the ID-CHECK system, National and Alamo have announced plans to roll out the self-service check-in solution at many other major airports nationwide.

Mr. Todd Liebman, Senior VP of Marketing & COO of Intelli-Check, stated, “This order is another example of how ID-CHECK can increase both productivity and security in retail applications where speed and ID proofing are paramount. We have other pilot programs in various stages of testing. We believe that each successful pilot that leads to a phased roll out reinforces our conclusion that Intelli-Check’s proprietary technology is a vital link to both increased security and greater productivity. We also believe that each success will reduce the long sales cycle we have encountered in the past. We are very optimistic that successful pilots, such as those done at National and Alamo airport locations, will continue to create business opportunities for Intelli-Check over the next few years.”

Jerry Dow, Chief Marketing Officer of Vanguard Car Rental USA Inc., said, “We have been very pleased with the way our customers are embracing the new technology, a first in our industry, as well as the service and support provided by Intelli-Check Inc. and Kiosk Information Systems.”

About Intelli-Check, Inc.

Intelli-Check, Inc. is the acknowledged leader in technology that helps assure the authenticity of driver licenses, state issued non-driver and military identification cards used as proof of identity. Our patented ID-CHECK technology instantly reads, analyzes, and verifies the encoded data in magnetic stripes and barcodes on government-issue IDs from approximately 60 jurisdictions in the U.S. and Canada to determine if the content and format is valid. For more information, please visit www.intellicheck.com.

About Vanguard Car Rental USA Inc.

As operator of the National Car Rental and Alamo Rent A Car brands, Vanguard Car Rental USA Inc. comprises one of the leading car rental companies, with more than 3,200 locations in 83 countries, including the United States, Canada, Mexico, Europe, the Caribbean, Latin America, Asia, the Pacific Rim, Africa, the Middle East and Australia.

About KIOSK Information Systems (KIOSK)

KIOSK Information Systems is the world leader in design, manufacturing, service and support of indoor and outdoor kiosks, public Internet stations and other electronic self-service informational terminals. KIOSK is the OEM manufacturer of self-service terminals for Dell, Hewlett Packard, Sony Photo, US Transportation Security Administration and many others. KIOSK corporate clients include McDonalds, Ticketmaster, FedEx, Safeway, Citibank, Disney, Exxon Mobil, US Postal Service and Wal-Mart, as well as numerous government agencies and universities. KIOSK has facilities in Louisville, CO and Falkirk, Scotland, UK. Major vertical product markets include Retail, HR, Government, Photo and Digital Media, Voting, and OEM kiosk services. http://www.kiosk.com

Intelli-Check Safe Harbor Statement

Certain statements in this press release constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended. When used in this press release, words such as "will," "believe," "expect," anticipate, "encouraged" and similar expressions, as they relate to the company or its management, as well as assumptions made by and information currently available to the company's management identify forward-looking statements. Our actual results may differ materially from the information presented here. There is no assurance that the use of ID-CHECK technology by our potential customers and partners, or government efforts to enhance security or curtail the sale of age-restricted products to underage buyers will lead to additional sales of ID-CHECK technology. Additional information concerning forward-looking statements is contained under the heading of risk factors listed from time to time in the company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. We do not assume any obligation to update the forward-looking information.
Contacts

Intelli-Check, Inc.
Frank Mandelbaum, CEO, 516-992-1900
or
Wolfe Axelrod Weinberger Assoc. LLC
Stephen D. Axelrod, CFA, 212-370-4500
steve@wolfeaxelrod.com
or
Media:
Alisa D. Steinberg, 212-370-4500
alisa@wolfeaxelrod.com
Fax: 212-370-4500
or
Vanguard Car Rental USA Inc.
Charles L. Pulley, 918-401-6450
Director, Corporate Communications
pulleyc@vanguardcar.com

Posted by staff at 01:21 PM

November 30, 2006

Airline Security -- new kiosk unveiled by GE

VerifiedSRTKiosk-90.jpg The much anticipated Registered Traveler program just moved a little further along. The program, which allows travelers to pay extra money to go through screening faster than other travelers by pre-registering themselves with a DHS background check and biometric and identity information on file, has been in a pilot process as technology and policy for its management was created.

SecurityInfoWatch.com
Information, Assessment and Community

Updated: November 30th, 2006 10:16 AM EDT
A New Kiosk for Air Security, as Registered Traveler Moves Forward
GE kiosk gets 'Cleared' as Regist and GE demonstrate new identification and sensor kiosk

GE Security unveiled its full-featured kiosk for the TSA Registered Traveler program. The GE kiosk is being used with Verified's Clear program (the TSA Registered Traveler program is managed at the individual level by private companies, but overseen by the TSA).

GE Security unveiled its full-featured kiosk for the TSA Registered Traveler program. The GE kiosk is being used with Verified's Clear program (the TSA Registered Traveler program is managed at the individual level by private companies, but overseen by the TSA).

The much anticipated Registered Traveler program just moved a little further along. The program, which allows travelers to pay extra money to go through screening faster than other travelers by pre-registering themselves with a DHS background check and biometric and identity information on file, has been in a pilot process as technology and policy for its management was created.

On Friday it was clear that progress had indeed been made, as the Transportation Security Administration announced that it is setting an annual fee of $28 to handle background checks for Registered Traveler participants.
VerifiedSRTKiosk-90.jpg
As if that wasn't progress enough for the program, GE Security today unveiled a new technology kiosk that could be used as part of the program.

The company's technology launch was that of its Secure Registered Traveler (SRT) kiosk, which it was unveiling at the National Safe Skies Alliance Symposium in Washington, D.C. The kiosk had been tested as part of the Verified's Clear program, one of a few private businesses that provide the Registered Traveler services. Clear, the only one currently TSA approved -- though many others are close behind in the process to become TSA approved -- currently has 32,000 customers registered who pay roughly $100 per year for the privilege to move more quickly through security.

Read rest of story

Note: this is the "verification" iteration of kiosk. There is also the "enrollment" version of this kiosk as well.

Posted by staff at 12:49 PM

August 29, 2005

Biometric Traveler Kiosks in Israel

Since 1998, the kiosks have successfully handled about 5 million transactions. For members of the program, the kiosk system cuts wait times from two hours to as little as 10 seconds during peak periods.

Israel uses hands-on approach for trusted travelers
Biometrics-based system offers lessons for security officials

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Because of Israel's history and location, security has always been a priority for the country's authorities, even as they try to maintain the routines of everyday life. The tension between those interests resurfaced in 1998 when officials sought a way to handle the surge of Holy Land pilgrims expected for the millennium celebrations.

Ben Gurion Airport, the country's only international facility, was aging and already strained by the millions of passengers who annually passed through it. Israel's solution was a trusted-traveler program that resembles the U.S. Homeland Security Department's Passenger Accelerated Service System (INSPASS), which was already in place at several U.S. international airports.

U.S. officials launched INSPASS as a response to a 1990 law that required DHS to cut waiting periods in airport immigration halls to no more than 45 minutes. INSPASS allowed trusted foreign passengers who had previously been cleared to use special kiosks where they could quickly verify their identities using hand-recognition biometrics.

The Ben Gurion system, in operation within three months after its contract award in April 1998, quickly enrolled more than 160,000 citizens and used four kiosks to process them. The airport now has 22 kiosks eight for departures and 14 for arrivals to handle 250,000 enrollees.

The Israelis' experience offers U.S. security officials some lessons about the influence of cultural and policy contexts on the development of technology-based security systems.

How it works

At Ben Gurion, passengers who want to participate in the trusted traveler program receive a smart card when they enroll. The card stores an array of encrypted personal information, from criminal histories to the dozens of measurements of fingers, knuckle shapes and distances between joints in the hands.

As part of the flight check-in process, trusted passengers go to a kiosk and swipe their smart cards through a reader and then place their hands over a biometric scanner.

Once the scanner verifies a passenger's identity, the system prints a coupon that allows the passenger to whisk through the rest of the check-in process.

Since 1998, the kiosks have successfully handled about 5 million transactions. For members of the program, the system cuts wait times from two hours to as little as 10 seconds during peak periods.

"It helped that Israelis were fairly enamored and interested in biometrics to start with, and there is no real social stigma there to using hand geometry," said Jeff Poulson, a technical consultant at EDS' Access Controls Solutions Division, which developed and installed the INSPASS and Ben Gurion systems. "There are other biometrics that are just as good, such as fingerprints, but they are associated with criminality and hand geometry is less threatening."

The Israelis had another purpose for the Ben Gurion program, Poulson said, because they were also looking to install biometrics systems for border control. They considered the airport project to be a fairly controlled environment in which to evaluate the technology.

Because of the success of the Ben Gurion program, the Israelis have expanded biometrics to several border points.

The Israel Airports Authority is also working closely with the Israeli National Police, who vet the travelers who can enroll in the program, Poulson said. That collaboration helps ensure that the program has the support of influential stakeholders.

But U.S. airports may not be able to deploy the same systems.

When Jonathan Tucker, senior research fellow at the Monterey Institute of International Studies' Center for Nonproliferation Studies, visited Israel several years ago to investigate the country's counterterrorism practices, he noted the effectiveness of airline passenger screening.

Screening is central to Israel's security approach, he said, because it aims to ferret out individuals with terrorist intentions. By letting people who have been deemed to pose no threat pass through the automated system, officials can more closely check individual travelers, including conducting one-on-one interviews that can last as long as an hour.

The United States, however, has traditionally given priority to screening baggage rather than people. And the much higher volume of travelers passing through major U.S. airports makes Israeli techniques, such as in-depth personal interviews, impractical, Tucker said.

The Transportation Security Administration began testing its trusted-traveler system last year. It attempts to expedite the process for U.S. residents rather than foreign visitors and uses fingerprints and iris scans rather than hand geometry. But in all other respects, it's similar to the Ben Gurion system.

Tucker said he has concerns about the system because it resembles a federal government security clearance process, complete with a background investigation, "which could pose privacy concerns for many people."

Indeed, those concerns have caused a stir. As soon as TSA announced its trusted-traveler test program, it received privacy complaints from the Electronic Privacy Information Center and others, which continue to dog the agency.

The Ben Gurion system has been recognized as a jewel in the biometrics crown. The airport authority received AFCEA International's inaugural Golden Link award in 2001, and other airports are already emulating the technology.

Poulson said biometrics tests are under way at airports in Frankfurt, Germany; Amsterdam, Netherlands; London; and the United States.

"People have become more sensitized to biometrics since [the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks,] and the traveling public is becoming more familiar and comfortable with them," he said.

Security concerns will likely persist, he added, but people want the increased security and convenience that a system such as Ben Gurion's could provide.

* Israel's Ben Gurion Airport is the country's only international facility, and passenger volume is increasing rapidly. Terminal 3, which opened in November 2004, is built to handle as many as 16 million passengers a year.
* The trusted-traveler program has enrolled about 250,000 frequent Israeli fliers.
* The airport initially started with four biometric inspection kiosks, and 22 now exist. They handle about 5 million transactions each year.


Read rest of article

Posted by keefner at 11:27 PM

August 16, 2005

Biometrics - Iris Technology

biometrics.jpgNIST to evaluate iris recognition technology. Iridian Technologies Inc. of Moorestown, N.J., announced this month that its iris recognition technology has been selected for the Registered Traveler program at Orlando International Airport. It is the nations first privately sponsored program to register frequent travelers for speedier airport passage via kiosks and is sanctioned by DHS. Travelers submit biometric fingerprint and iris information and pay a fee to participate in the program.

NIST to evaluate iris recognition technology

By Alice Lipowicz
Contributing Staff Writer

Iris recognition is receiving its first major government technical review under an evaluation launched this month by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

NISTs Iris Challenge Evaluation is being billed as the first large-scale, open, independent technology evaluation for iris recognition, according to the institutes announcement. The study is intended to promote the development and advancement of iris recognition technology and assess its state-of-the-art capability, NIST said.

Iris recognition is a biometric technology in which a persons eyes are photographed and the unique patterns of the irises is catalogued for purposes of identity verification.

The technology is currently being deployed in several pilot projects including screening of frequent travelers at several U.S. airports sponsored by the Homeland Security Department and, separately, in testing by British immigration authorities at Heathrow Airport in London.

The first phase of the evaluation, running from August 2005 through January 2006, will review specific queries related to iris recognition technology capabilities, including establishing a performance baseline to measure future progress.

In a planned second phase, which is being considered for the first quarter of 2006, NIST researchers will measure performance with sequesteredor not previously vieweddata, using standard testing methodology, NIST said.

The test is jointly sponsored by federal agencies, including the FBI, the National Institute of Justice and the Homeland Security Department, among others.

The testing is occurring as iris recognition is being utilized in several biometric pilot projects worldwide.

Iridian Technologies Inc. of Moorestown, N.J., announced this month that its iris recognition technology has been selected for the Registered Traveler program at Orlando International Airport. It is the nations first privately sponsored program to register frequent travelers for speedier airport passage and is sanctioned by DHS. Travelers submit biometric fingerprint and iris information and pay a fee to participate in the program.

Lockheed Martin Corp. of Bethesda, Md., and New York-based Verified Identity Pass Inc. are operating the program in partnership with DHS and the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority.

In addition, Iridian said its iris recognition technology has also been deployed at the departments five other Registered Traveler pilot program airports: Minneapolis-St.Paul, Los Angeles, Houston, Boston and Washingtons Reagan National.

Rest of article

Posted by keefner at 03:46 PM

March 21, 2005

WiBro Technology

Samsung demonstrates WiBro technology

read full article

18/03/2005 by John Tilak

South Korean electronics company Samsung is demonstrating wireless broadband (WiBro) products and technology at the annual Cellular Telecommunications & Internet Association (CTIA) trade show.

In the five months since it unveiled the first WiBro demo in November 2004 in Korea, Samsung has been able to reduce the size of the WiBro compartment, shrinking the equipment to a tenth of the size of the original demo.

Samsung intends to commercially launch WiBro data access systems and handsets in Korea next year with sector data throughput speeds of up to 30 Mbps. Samsung is to use the experience gained from the Korean WiBro deployment to drive ongoing development of WiMax equipment for the global market.

WiBro, based on the 802.16e standard, offers mobility, wide-area services and global standardisation for wireless broadband applications.

Posted by Craig at 04:07 PM